Tips For Staying In a Hotel With Your Dog

Many of us will be hitting the road for the holidays with our dogs in tow. After all, our dogs are part of the family and many of us wouldn’t dream of leaving them behind. With the hustle and bustle of car rides, check in and unfamiliar places, HelpEmUp offers these tips for a safe and serene adventure:

Continue reading

Is Your Senior Dog Overweight?

The statistics are startling … over half of all American dogs are overweight or obese. That’s 35 million dogs! That goes right along with three out of every four Americans are overweight.

Unfortunately, if you’re in this group, you could be cutting your own life and your dog’s life short.

According to PetMd, obesity is common in dogs of all ages, but it usually occurs in middle-aged dogs, and generally in those that are between the ages of 5 and 10. Neutered and indoor dogs also tend to have a higher risk of becoming obese.

Continue reading

Why Puppies Aren’t For Everyone

Who doesn’t love a puppy? They are cute, adorable and full of fun. You can’t help but smile when a puppy is around, complete with adoring eyes that follow you everywhere you go. Their faces are so sweet!

However, puppies are not for everyone. This true story tells the tale of how a puppy can be a disaster if placed in the wrong hands.

My mother-in-law is 84 years old and lives on her own in a senior community in California. She is in relatively good health but has a bad back and mobility issues. Six months ago she lost her beloved labradoodle Hannah and was devastated. As she has had dogs ever since she was a child, she decided she was ready for another dog.

I encouraged her to get a senior dog, one that was already trained. However, she was insistent the dog be a labradoodle. I called animal shelters and rescue groups throughout California and was told these dogs are rarely abandoned because they are “designer dogs”. Instead, she decided to get a puppy who was lovingly delivered to her at 12-weeks-old.

My mother-in-law has brand new white carpeting and a white couch. She was having trouble housebreaking the dog because ”stern” is just not in her personality at this age. Even though she could give us the “stink eye” over the years, the dog did not respond to this type of discipline. It’s now been 4 months and “Lucy” is still pooping all over the house. “What are you going to do?” I ask her. “No worries”, she says. “I’ll just buy new carpeting.”  “I leave the patio door open every night with the light on in hopes she’ll go outside on my patio.”

Does she think there are no burglars? She leaves the lights on – might as well invite the thieves in for a cup of coffee!

Continue reading

Preparing Your Senior Dog to the Vet

Many of us fear going to the doctor or dentist. The office can have an antiseptic smell and we often associate the visit with shots.

It’s no different for dogs. Although taking them to the vet is essential for their health and well-being, a visit can be distressing for our canine companions. Not only will they encounter hundreds of new smells, slippery floors, and strange people, but they may also hear barking dogs, meowing cats, and strange voices. The experience may be overwhelming for even the most mellow dog.

Continue reading

Choosing the Right Vet For Your Senior Dog

After you and your family, one of the most important individuals in your dog’s life will be his/her vet.  He will be the one helping you with your dog’s nutrition, health and care. As many of us have senior dogs, there needs can be quite different than puppies or even middle-aged dogs. Therefore, it is important to choose a veterinarian wisely.

Get a Reference
The best place to start is with your friends and family, local rescues or shelters, groomers, dog trainers or pet sitters, particularly if they live in your neighborhood and feel the same way about your pet as you do. The worse time to introduce your dog to a new vet is when he’s not feeling well. Consider making a “get to know you” appointment so you can see if it is a good fit.

Friendliness
Just like children and doctors, many dogs and cats are afraid to go to the vet. Was the front desk staff nice? Is the vet calm with a good bedside manner? Is it fairly easy to get an appointment if there is an emergency? A full waiting room can be good, because that means your vet is well liked. However, no one wants to wait an hour before even being seen! Continue reading

Dog Friendly Fruits and Vegetables

>Summertime can mean visits to the pool or lake, family and friend barbeques, and a more relaxed atmosphere overall. The kids are generally out of school, so the early morning hustle and bustle to get out the door and the late night homework assignments don’t re-start until mid-August.

If you’re like me, your meals are lighter in the summer. Why? Because it’s often too hot to cook or eat a heavy meal. The good news? Not only do I get more exercise in the summer, but I eat better — fruits and vegetables galore.

Many fruits and vegetables are low in calorie and provide vital vitamins that your body craves. Did you know that many of these are good for your dog as well?

Continue reading

Protect Your Dog or Cat From a Hot Car

Chances are the first thing you do when you enter your car during the summer is turn the air conditioner on full blast. Otherwise it’s an oven!

A recent study found that 62% of dog owners say they would never leave their pets alone in a car on a warm day. That means 39% would!

Every year, too many dogs suffer and die when their owners make the mistake of leaving them in a parked car—even for “just a minute”. If the temperature outside is 78 degrees, that means the inside of the car is between 100 and 120 degrees in just minutes! If the temperature is 90 degrees outside it can be a staggering 160 degrees in the car.

At these temperatures, a dog can suffer from brain damage and heatstroke in just 15 minutes. Why? Because dogs have a harder time sweating than humans because they can only sweat through their paws.

Continue reading