Can You Love Your Dog Too Much?

Can you love your dog too much?

We all love our dogs. Many people even think of them as their “children”. Developing a loving relationship with your dog based on respect is what all responsible dog owners should be doing.

How can you not love your dog? He doesn’t judge you. He is always happy to see you. He doesn’t care what you look like or how much money you have. He/she loves you unconditionally … and doesn’t talk back!

Believe it or not, you can love your dog too much, to the point where it is not good for the dog. Spoiling your dog a little is to be expected … accepting bad behavior is not.

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Some Solutions for your Dog’s Itching

#stop dog scratching

Tips for a dog to stop scratching his skin

Skin allergies are quite common in dogs. Just like humans, dogs can be allergic to a range of things, from products (shampoos, carpets, insecticides) to environmental factors (pollen, mold) to parasites (ticks and fleas). Anxiety, dry skin and hormonal imbalances can also contribute to your dog’s scratching. Dogs itch and scratch normally, but when it becomes compulsive, it means your dog is extremely uncomfortable. Let’s explore some of the signs and treatments to help your pooch.

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5 Health Hazards for your Dog in Winter

#dogsinwinter #healthhazardsBrrr. Even if you live in balmier states such as Florida and California, the temperatures in the winter months dip. In some parts of the country, they can be downright freezing! Here are some health hazards for your dog in winter.

Freezing Temperatures
If the temperatures dip below 32 degrees Fahrenheit, your dog could be susceptible to frostbite and hypothermia. Frostbite occurs when blood vessels near the skin constrict, reduce blood flow to certain areas of the body, causing those tissues to freeze. Some signs of frostbite in dogs include:

  • Discoloration of the skin – becomes bluish, pale or gray
  • Brittleness to the area when touched
  • Pain when you touch the body part
  • Blisters or skin ulcers
  • Blackened or dead skin

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Hair Raising Facts About Dog Hackles

#doghackles #aggressivedogsDoes the hair on your arm, neck or head ever go up involuntarily when you are stressed or overexcited? In humans it is called “goosebumps” but in dogs it’s called “hackles”. The medical term in dogs is piloerection, with pilo meaning hair. Hair doesn’t talk yet it does tell the emotional state of a dog. It is a dog’s way of communicating his feelings. Cats, rats, birds and humans all share the same reaction. Porcupines use this for protection to scare off predators.

A dog’s hackles run down its neck, backbone, shoulder and to the base of its tail. All dogs have hackles, but it is more obvious in certain breeds than others. You can’t see hackling as easily in breeds with longer and fluffier hair, while breeds with short hair tend to show their piloerection more clearly.

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Are You a Responsible Dog Owner?

With September being AKC Responsible Dog Owner Month, we thought we would reiterate what being a good dog owner is all about. Most of us had our first pet as a child, when our parents were trying to teach us responsibility. Chances are, you tried to get out of cleaning up after the dog and quickly realized that having a dog was not all about fun and games. You learned that responsibility is so much more than the basics of food and shelter.

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Your Cell Phone Can Keep Your Dog Healthy

Technology can make all of our lives easier, particularly one that is close at hand – our cell phone. Cell phones are great for taking fun videos and pictures as well as tracking some important information about your dog. Additionally, there are various apps for dog owners that can keep your dog healthier and happier.

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How Often Should You Bathe Your Dog?

Do dogs get stinkier in the summer because they perspire more in the heat! Does your dog like baths or does he fight you?

Dog baths can be messy, particularly if your dog is bigger. Just like humans, dogs can get stinky too. A swim in the lake or river may be your dog’s idea of fun, but it’s not the best cleaning method for your dog’s fur.

Although a general rule of thumb is to bathe your dog once/month, the real answer depends on your dog’s breed, the environment, level of activity and any skin issues.  Remember, the only sweat glands on a dog are between their paws. There are some dog owners who never bathe their dog (not advised), but their dogs do not have an unpleasant odor. If you find dog cleaning to be too difficult, make your life easy and take your dog to a dog groomer – they even have mobile dog groomers that will come to your home!

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Avoid Costly Vet Bills With Your Senior Dog

Your dog will probably visit the veterinarian many times during his life. There are the annual wellness checks and the routine shots and vaccines. Going to the vet can be very costly, particularly if it is on an emergency basis.

According to the American Pet Products Association, Americans spent an estimated $15.92 billion on veterinary care in 2016. If your pet suddenly ingests something he shouldn’t or breaks a bone, a trip to the vet is necessary. However, there are some precautions you can take to make these emergency trips as far, and few in between, as possible.

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